Here’s how I cooked my homemade pizza

I never cook; I dabble. But then I enjoy dabbling in the kitchen every once in a while, and I almost always end up experimenting with new dishes (sometimes coming up with my own recipes mostly because I did not have something at home, or I burnt up what I did have.)

Today I got down to cooking one of my homemade vegetarian pizzas, famous within the four walls of my home if nowhere else. This is not the first time I’m doing this — I have cooked pizzas on a handful of occasions before — but I come back to this because pizzas are so easy to cook and taste good with little effort, but they are pretty hard to get perfectly right.

I cook with wine, sometimes I even add it to the food.

–W.C. Fields

With today’s attempt (which I made with more caution, care and by taking more time off — TLC and all that) I was actually overjoyed to end up with a pizza that tasted just like a pizzeria’s. So in this article I tell you how I did it.

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The nitty-gritty of making V.H.B.’s homemade pizza:

Time: 30 min (depending on how fast you are)

Serving: 2-4 (depending on your appetite)

N.B. 1 This is a vegetarian pizza.

N.B. 2 Oven settings get better by trail and error.

N.B. 3 There is no such thing as free Google Glass.

Ingredients:

  • Pizza dough or base (I prefer to get a base because it saves time)
  • 1 tsp olive oil (Popeye’s girl, yeah)
  • 1 green capsicum, sliced
  • 1 red capsicum, sliced
  • 1 small onion, squared
  • 1 small zucchini (I use the green kind), sliced
  • 2 medium tomatoes, diced
  • Olives (as you like them)
  • Jalapeño (as you like them)
  • Baby corn (as you like them)
  • 1/2 cup mushroom, diced
  • 1/2 cum diced tofu, cubed
  • Mozarella or cheddar cheese (as per taste)
  • 500g tomato sauce
  • 200g tomato paste/puree
  • 1 tbsp oregano
  • 1 tbsp basil leaves, finely chopped
  • 1/2 tsp sugar
  • 1 tsp garlic (as per taste)
  • An oven (preferably in working condition)
  • Blender
  • Nvidia project shield (just because it’s so great to have)

Alright, now onto the serious stuff ahead. Continue reading

Evernote Mobile – Part 1: Getting started

If you have not heard of Evernote, you definitely are living under a rock. Evernote is a powerful, cross-platform, note-taking and collaboration app. And if you read our recent notes-app comparison, you will see just how feature-rich Evernote is.

Now, on the other hand, if you have not yet got started with it for some reason, that is excusable. With this seven-part series, you are sure to be an advanced Evernote user (we call ourselves ‘Evernote junkies’) and — here is the real deal — you will be using Evernote not just as a note-taking app, but as one to improve your productivity and (seemingly) lengthen you day!

Evernote Mobile

I will only be talking about Evernote on mobile devices (be it iOS, Android or something else, Evernote is basically the same build-, design- and structure-wise) because its mobile app itself is so plump with features and targeted at several types of users that it is going to us seven interesting articles to cover.

I am going to be putting up  one every two or three days to help you digest the information effectively. So, today, let us start with a quick run-down of what Evernote is, what you can do with it and getting a basic understanding of how Evernote works. Continue reading

How to add an end mark to your articles on WordPress

END-MARKS ARE A typographical feature, most probably derived from the technology and computer-science industry, that employs a use of a symbol, text or icon to signal the end of a piece of text to the reader.

Personally, I am a great fan of end-marks, and I was using them in my first blog at WordPress.com but things changed later and, (unless I manually inserted them every time,) I had no way of fitting one into my articles… until now!

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As magazine features

If you have ever seen an end-mark before, it is probably in a magazine, at the end of every article (see picture below for examples.) Apart from being typographically good looking, these things serve to signal a more finished end to an article, much like a full stop does to a sentence. Once I managed to write a handful of code, I began employing end-marks on this website as my regular readers would probably have noticed.

Endmark examples

As I said already, manually inserting end-marks after every article is a tedious job; but, on the other hand, it cannot always be fully automated either. For instance, Colin Temple has a great endmark plugin that appends an end-mark of your choice to your articles.

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Endmark plugin

However, as I found out myself, if you have meddled with some of the code previously (or even if you have not, in some cases,) such as including certain sharing options after your blog post etc., the sharing buttons come wrapped into the main content division (they even do so native-ly on some themes) and you end up with an endmark after the sharing options, which can turn out to be awkward. Continue reading

Everything you need to know about typography: Part III

IN THIS FINAL installment of our 3-article series on typography, we are going to get our hands dirty and take up a fairly complicated project and design typesets in a circumstance mirroring the real world.

[hr_padding] [notice type=”red”]Did you know that this is the third article on a series introducing you to the basics and intermediate levels of Typography? Head over to the first article, and then visit the second one too to get a better idea of what we’re doing in this post.
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Getting hired on a typesetting project

It is going to be a hands-on, real-world experience, so do not take the back seat and read through this. Try, instead, to participate every step of the way and go to a step only after you have finished the last. I have coded this article to make that easy for you. To start, click step 1, and once you are done, click step 2 to reveal it and so on. That way you will not sneak a peak involuntarily.

And before we go on, here is a word about our client of today: he is going to need us to typeset a heavily textual, offline work, covering consistency, readability and overall appearance, and he has several demands that we will learn from him soon. But we shall try to handle it in ways that can be used for either an offline or online work — and for you to get a good picture about on-set typography. Continue reading

Everything you need to know about typography: Part II

WELCOME BACK TO the 3-aricle series on the A to Z of typography. This part continues from part I that we saw previously, so if you have missed out on that, make sure you head over to part I and familiarise yourself with all the jargon and basics of typography before continuing with this; you are bound to benefit best that way.

If you have already come through that route, keep going right on! In this part we will discuss several more interesting — and, more importantly, fun — things like I had promised last time. Here is a quick look at the highlights of this article:

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  1. Considerations when selecting typefaces
  2. Web-safe typefaces
  3. Standard print typefaces in the publishing industry, and
  4. Some good, important rules and practices when handling typefaces
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In this article I am going to make fairly open use of some of the terminology you have learnt in the preceding article, so try to keep up. Any time you cannot, just keep the first article open in a alternate tab on your browser!

[hr_padding] [notice type=”green”] After Part 1 of this series, I got several requests to deal with the problem of the near-infinite scrolling, since these are considerably long posts. (This part, for instance, is around 3,000 words long.)

So I sat down, and, with a handful of code and a slightly altered design around that region, managed to break down this post into three pages.

Once you reach the bottom of this page, you have a direction-link to the following pages. Continue reading

Pages: 1 2 3

Everything you need to know about typography: Part I

[dropcap1]I[/dropcap1] AM A self-confessed type-nerd and hobbyist typographer. To me, typography is more than a subject and typefaces more than designs. And I believe the choosing right typefaces can convey a powerful message, and — unfortunately — choosing the wrong ones can be devastating.

[hr_padding] [notice type=”red”] This is part of a 3-article series that continues onto the second article. Continue reading here.
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Introduction

But choosing fonts is more than just liking one and picking it: there are factors to consider, from legibility to atmosphere; and technical details to pay attention to, such as the ones we will see in this post series. And that is why I choose to write this quick, three-part series on how to choose typefaces for any work you take up in the future: in particular, the ever-growing population of websites, web designers and the like; and alongside them people whipping up their own ebooks or, equally importantly, to those looking to bring out books offline (particularly my good friend, Raghul Selvam, who I hope is benefited by this post as much as I intended.)

The point is that one needs to know quite a lot about typefaces and typography before they are able to take a good enough decision and make their work look professional.

[hr_padding] [notice type=”yellow”]Did you know?

Contrary to popular belief, there are a handful of sentences containing all letters of the English language. Here are some of them:

  • Grumpy wizards make toxic brew for the evil Queen and Jack.
Continue reading

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10 people to follow on Twitter and add value to your stream

Twitter is here to stay. Many spoke of how Google+ may be a threat to Twitter–or words to that effect–but my own belief is that Twitter is something along entirely different lines and Google+ has nothing to do with it. With this in mind, I can safely state that Twitter is the only other social network I am active in, besides Google+, and if you have not tasted the network much or, like thousands of others, have created an account you probably do not even remember, I strongly suggest you go back start becoming active.

Ready?

This list I have built up is of ten of those who have added value to my Twitter stream and to yours too if you will start following them. While this can serve as a starting point to people who are new to Twitter, it is also a checklist for the others to make sure they are not missing out on some great stuff by not following these awesome people.

Needless to say, I follow all of them. But let us not spend too much time on chatter; head over to the list ((If you cannot see the images above, the list includes these people: Marsha Collier,  Alexis Madrigal, Jeff Elder, Ed Yong, Maria Popova, Phil Plait, Michael Merced, Tilly Blyth, Robert Reibold and Andrew Cohen.))below (which is in no particular order.)

Before you jump in, click here to start following me on Twitter if you like!

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