Camus, from the Penguin ‘Great Ideas’ edition

It is not often that I write about the cover of a book, complete with a handful of photographs, but this is exactly what I intend to do now. Stepping back to look at the larger picture, it is just as rarely that we pause to appreciate the typesetting, designing, formatting and binding of paper books.

I think most of us readers should do this more often than jumping straight into the I recently ordered Albert Camus’ The Myth of Sisyphus on Amazon and unwrapped my package to behold one of the most beautifully laid books I have had the fortune of coming across in recent times. But I digress; I now intend to — most literally — judge the cover of a book. Continue reading

A list of 100 books everyone must read

The BBC, a few years ago, came out with a massive list of one hundred books everyone must read before they die, and I decided to read all the books on that list I have not yet read. One could think of this as a project, but to me it is more of a journey. But then I saw Harry Potter in third place and realised I was better off looking for a different list that was more to my taste. (Yes, I am a big fan of LOTR.)

Personally, though, I like to think of it as nourishment and it makes sense to pick the nourishments you like, so I turned to The Guardian. Sure enough, they had two lists: one made in 2003 and another updated only three months ago. I picked the latter, and started re–organising them for my convenience and started reading today with number 20: Little Women, by Louisa May Alcott. So the project — shall we all agree to simply call it an expedition? — begins today. Now. Continue reading

Book review: The girl with the dragon tattoo

It is not often that I review books; if I reviewed every book I read, I would probably be too busy reading and writing every waking moment of my day. That said, the fact that I wanted to take time to speak about swede, Stieg Larsson’s, longtime bestseller speaks volumes about the book.

This review may contain mild spoilers, but nothing to irreversibly dent your reading suspense, so you should find it safe to go on.

First of all, (off the top of my head) I must say that I found the title rather misleading. This book is about a lot of things — including Lisbeth Salander, Mr Larsson’s masterful creation of a goth hacker dwelling in the tech underworld, confused and careless about everything in her life — but Salander, the titular girl with the dragon tattoo, is no bigger a player in it than any other. Continue reading