Apple, Google or Microsoft — whoever wins, you lose

It is entertaining — perhaps even pleasing — to watch such tech giants as Apple, Google and Microsoft battle it out year after year. And it is fun to take sides (we always do that). But it is becoming increasingly clear that no matter who wins in the end, and at whatever rate, us consumers will be little more than sore losers.

I must admit, this was neither clear nor obvious to me a couple of years back — and why should it be? I was immersed in the Android ecosystem; and I can say this much for certain: anybody who has not seen outside Android cannot possibly understand the gravity of this situation.

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How I arrange my iPhone 6 Plus home screen

To many people, their home screens seem like a trivial aspect of smartphone usage. But having a cluttered home screen goes against the concept of a smart phone itself: if you cannot find what you need when you need it without searching for it for hither and thither, it becomes clear that your phone is smarter than you. Which is a pretty dangerous thing when you think of it.

Whatever platform you are on, having your phone set up for the most efficient use is a no-brainer. Having moved from the freedom of Android to the decidedly more sophisticated approach of iOS, I will focus on setting up your iPhone 6 Plus home screen. But the basic ideas should carry on for most devices.

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Why I moved from the Galaxy Note 3 to iPhone 6 Plus

After I recently bought a silver iPhone 6 Plus, I received several e-mails asking me about my jump to iOS, why I bought a silver/white device as opposed to my customary black and a few other comments. I decided to address them in a brief article here instead of answering several mails. (And before we go ahead, please know that I still own and use my Note 3, and still think of it as an extremely capable, future-proof device — and recommend it.)

After Apple’s iPhone 3GS came out in 2009, Google replied with the first of its now-successful Nexus lineup, the Nexus One. Android was customisable, seemingly the tech of the future, thanks to its fearless attempt at everything from NFC to underwater phones to wireless charging. With the iPhone 6/6 Plus, two things changed for me: Apple seemed to awaken and see the smartphone scene from a different perspective, and my own smartphone usage changed in certain ways.

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OS X Yosemite: thoughts

I have often complained that Apple’s lack of innovation is showing lately, and it is hard to argue with that: the company’s last trademark introduction was the first iPad back in 2010 — if you count the Newton MessagePad 100 as their first tablet, then their last introduction would be 2008’s original MacBook Air. From then on, everything was a fuzzy, confused release of hardware and software that consistently failed to impress.

It took them till June 2014 to give any further promising signs, but it is here at last — as far as software goes. OS X Yosemite, the eleventh iteration of OS X, brings in the concept of continuity to the iEcosystem, in effect strengthening Apple’s core business strategy — to craft an experience for its users.

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How to use Alfred on Mac — an introduction

OS X is certainly built around getting things done in a straightforward manner. The workings of the operating system, its user-friendly approach to everything and the clean interface makes working a pleasure.

However there is still room for speeding up interactions; not the system itself, but the way we go about getting things done. What takes several clicks and wading through window after window to initiate or terminate can be reduced to a handful of clicks.

Alfred is an extremely popular app on Mac that can help you get nearly everything done with just a few clicks, often just two. But a lot of people are either still unaware of it or hesitant to try it out owing to its slightly steep learning curve. That was why I wanted to go over Alfred in this quick introductory article, and share my own experiences of how I became a consistent user of the app.

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5 simple ways Apple could vastly improve iCloud

Apple took the world by storm when it rained on its users access to a thundering 5GB of lightning-fast storage space on the cloud. Now before I get ahead of myself using more weather puns, let us step back and see where Apple’s cloud storage service, iCloud, should be standing, considering it led the cloud storage movement.

But it is simply not where it should have been: iCloud is nowhere near perfect, but unfortunately it is nowhere near useful either, especially if you use OS X and not iOS.

By contrast, Google’s Drive storage is not only superior, but it does not create a fuss about OS. It simply works, much like an Apple product is supposed to. It is the same case with Box, SugarSync, Copy, Dropbox (of which I have never been a big fan) etc. So what can Apple do with iCloud to to make people take notice of it?

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7 OS X Terminal commands you should know

Having been a Windows and Ubuntu user, joining the Mac tribe was extremely refreshing for me. And one of the things I noticed was that somehow, my Mac seemed to be made for me out of the box — leaving me with only a couple of minor tweaks to make.

That is not to say Macs are perfect; but they are a lot more understanding of humans than Windows. That means a majority of Mac users never explore the Terminal that comes with their computers: a lovely UNIX footprint available on the Mac.

But using the terminal, while not strictly necessary, is fun to do once-in-a-while. So whether you hope to get started or just see what the fuss is all about (and if you have a Mac) then these are seven OS X Terminal commands you should know.

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